Foto Friday – Karnak Temple

In 2008 we were lucky enough to get a chance to sail up the river Nile in a restored 1920’s Royal Steamer the SS Misr from Luxor to Aswan. We stopped at the monumental city of Thebes where you will find the world famous Karnak Temple Complex which comprises a vast mix of ruined temples, chapels, pylons, and other buildings, notably the Great Temple of Amun a massive structure begun by Pharaoh Ramses II (ca. 1391–1351 BC).

Find more photos from the trip here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jameshandlon/albums/72157627355513354

Foto Friday – Berber Desert Camp, Tinfou, Zagora

15 years ago we were the only ones to make it by camel through a whirlwind sandstorm to our camp for the night set amongst the dunes at Tinfou. There were plenty of seats left around the burnout campfire to choose from that evening! At the time it felt like the greatest adventure we had ever been on. Morocco – 2007

Foto Friday – The Inca Trail

Phuyupatamarca Camp – Night falls on the jungle and forests below us as we sit and watch from our elevated and precariously pitched tent right on the mountains edge. Phuyupatamarca provided one of the most dramatic campsites I have ever stayed at. The Inca Trail Peru – 2015.

Foto Friday – Japanese Lanterns Kyoto

I had always wanted to visit Japan and finally got the chance to go there in 2016. The culture, food, traditions and colours are so very different to the West.

Japanese Paper Lanterns are a traditional sight that can still be seen all over the country. I spotted these in a small side alley in the city of Kyoto. Kyoto is a very traditional city by Japanese standards with many old areas that have not changed much in decades managing to bypass the onset of modernity seen almost everywhere else in the densely populated areas of the country.

Traditional paper lanterns were made in the image of myths, things from nature and or in the spirit of local culture.

The Japanese word chōchin is used for these traditional lanterns which have a frame of split bamboo covered with paper, which can collapse flat into itself, and are usually designed to hang from a hook or a pole.